Binks & Associates has a long history of providing accurate and reliable information not only to our clients but also the industry more broadly. Search our Frequently Asked Questions section to find all aspects of Owners Corporation explained, including answers to common general questions and more specific information on strata rules and legislation.

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When you purchase an apartment, townhouse, unit or another style of dwelling in a strata title development, you become a member of an Owners Corporation.

An Owners Corporation is created when land is subdivided, and a plan of subdivision is registered at Land Use Victoria. Owners Corporations can be residential, commercial, retail, industrial, master-planned estates or mixed-use developments.

The Owners Corporation is responsible to manage, administer, repair and maintain the common property under the Owners Corporations Act 2006. Common property can include gardens, passages, stairwells, lifts, driveways and fences (Victorian Department of Justice and Regulation).

To be an Owners Corporation Manager in Victoria an entity must hold registration with the Business Licensing Authority and hold Professional Indemnity Insurance. Both a company and an individual can be registered manager.

To be an effective Owners Corporation Manager you must also have the appropriate internal management systems, a program for continued professional development for your staff and the support and assistance of a reliable network of contractors, suppliers and other professionals in the industry.

For more information on what the duties of an Owners Corporation manager are, see section “What are the duties of an Owners Corporation manager?”.

A Plan of Subdivision is the title plan most frequently used by licensed surveyors to draw up and determine the boundaries of lots and common property in Owners Corporations. Other types of plans are listed as follows:

  • Registered Plan.
  • Strata Plan.
  • Staged Plan of Subdivision.
  • Cluster Plan.

Plans of subdivision can define the boundaries of the lots in a number of ways, including:

  • Upper boundary.
  • Lower boundary.
  • Vertical boundary.
  • Horizontal boundary.

Such boundaries can be defined at the exterior face of the lot, interior face or the median of the lot. Some common phrases/styles used to define boundaries are as follows:

  • Location of boundaries are defined by thick continuous line.
  • The boundary of the lots are the interior face unless marked otherwise.
  • No upper boundary, no lower boundary.

Plans of subdivision also note easements including drainage, right of way and electrical substations.

In the context of Owners Corporations common property is a term used to define all land not owned by individual lot owners.

Common property can be the hallways and stairwells outside of the lot, the basement car park area (excluding private car parks), gardens and quite often the roof.

Prior to the 1st December 2021, Owners Corporations were divided into a simple two-tier system:
1) Non-prescribed,
or
2) Prescribed, if consisting of more than 100 Lots, or annual fee income exceeding $200,000 annually.
The two-tier system has been replaced with a five-tier system which delegates different responsibilities depending on the number of occupiable lots.

Tier 1 – More than 100 occupiable lots
Tier 2 – 51 to 100 occupiable lots
Tier 3 – 10 to 50 occupiable lots
Tier 4 – 3 to 9 occupiable lots
Tier 5 – 2 Lot or Common Services Only

Note: If an Owners Corporation consists of only non-occupiable lots or has less than ten occupiable and also more than 50 non-occupiable lots, then you must count all lots as if they were occupiable – Owners Corporations Act 2006 Division 1, Section 7, (7) (8). For more information on each of the 5 Tiers, please have a look at “What are the different obligations for each Tier”.

Tier 1

In addition to the standard requirement for all Owners Corporations, a Tier 1 Owners Corporation (consisting of more than 100 occupiable lots) has the following requirements:

  • Management: Must appoint a Manager unless it has been resolved by Special Resolution not to appoint a Manager. Additionally, this Special Resolution can be subsequently overturned by Ordinary Resolution – Owners Corporation Act 2006 – Section 119 (1)
  • Maintenance Planning: Must obtain and approve a Maintenance Plan and raise Maintenance Fees that are sufficient to allow that Maintenance Plan to be implemented – Owners Corporations Act 2006- Section 36 (1)

For more information on maintenance plans, look here

  • Auditing: Must have Financial Statements independently audited before circulation at the Annual General Meeting – Owners Corporations Act 2006 Section 35 (1)
  • Committee: Must elect a committee – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 100
  • Valuation for Insurance: Must obtain a sworn valuation for insurance purposes every five years – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 65 (1)
  • Voting Restrictions: A person must not vote as a proxy for more than 5% of the lot owners – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 89 D (1) (b)

Tier 2

In addition to the standard requirement for all Owners Corporations, a Tier 2 Owners Corporation  (consisting of more than 51 – 100 occupiable lots) has the following specific requirements:

  • Maintenance Planning: Must obtain and approve a Maintenance Plan and raise Maintenance Fees that are sufficient to allow that Maintenance Plan to be implemented – Owners Corporations Act 2006- Section 36 (1)

For more information on maintenance plans, look here

  • Reviewing Financials: Must have Financial Statements independently reviewed before circulation at the Annual General Meeting – Owners Corporations Act 2006 Section 35 (2)
  • Committee: Must elect a committee – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 100
  • Valuation for Insurance: Must obtain a sworn valuation for insurance purposes every five years – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 65 (1)
  • Voting Restrictions: A person must not vote as a proxy for more than 5% of the lot owners – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 89 D (1) (b)

 

 

Tier 3

A Tier 3 Owners Corporation  (consisting of more than 10 – 50 occupiable lots) has the following specific requirements:

  • Committee: Must elect a committee – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 100
  • Valuation for Insurance: Must obtain a sworn valuation for insurance purposes every five years – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 65 (1)
  • Voting Restrictions: If consisting of more than 20 occupiable lots, a person must not vote as a proxy for more than 5% of the lot owners. Alternatively, if consisting of 20 or less occupiable lots, a person must not vote as a proxy on behalf of more than one lot – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 89 D (1) (a) (b)
  • Optional Maintenance Planning: Has the option to choose if it wishes to obtain a Maintenance Plan. – Owners Corporations Act 2006- Section 36 (1)

For more information on maintenance plans, look here

  • Optional Audit: Has the option to have the Financial Statements independently audited before circulation at the Annual General Meeting – Owners Corporations Act 2006 Section 35 (2)

 

 

 

Tier 4

A Tier 4 Owners Corporation  (consisting of more than 3 – 9 occupiable lots) has the following specific requirements:

  • Option for Committee: Has the option to choose to elect a committee – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 100 (2)

Note: In the absence of an elected committee, the Owners Corporation must elect a Chairperson – Owners Corporations Act 2006 Section 98 (1)

  • Valuation for Insurance: Must obtain a sworn valuation for insurance purposes every five years – Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 65 (1)
  • Voting Restrictions: A person must not vote as a proxy for more than one lot –  Owners Corporations Act 2006 – Section 89 D (1) (a) 
  • Optional Maintenance Planning: Has the option to choose to obtain a Maintenance Plan – Owners Corporations Act 2006- Section 36 (1)

For more information on maintenance plans, look here

  • Optional Audit: Has the option to have the Financial Statements independently audited before circulation at the Annual General Meeting – Owners Corporations Act 2006 Section 35 (2)

 

Tier 5

A Tier 5 Owners Corporation consists of either two lots, or, if there is no common property and there are either metered on unmetered common services such as water supply, electrical and data, or drainage.

 

 

 

It is becoming more common for a property to have more than one Owners Corporation. Owners Corporations are becoming ever more complicated and may have a number of different buildings / style of occupation (commercial / retail / residential) all of which have their own maintenance obligations.

Setting up a property with more than one Owners Corporation is a method for helping an Owners Corporation apportion costs and responsibilities.

An Owners Corporation will have obligations and expenses that relate to the whole property including Insurance and Essential Safety Measures where-as other expenses such as Cleaning, Window Cleaning, Gardening may only relate to one section of the property. If there is a clear demarcation the person that establishes the Plan of Subdivision may create a second, third and sometimes fourth Owners Corporation

For example, a property that has a ground floor retail component and a residential building above it will incur some expenses that are attributable to the commercial component and some to the residential component. Having multiple Owners Corporations allows these expenses to be appropriately allocated so only the lot owners in the commercial component pay for expenses that service the commercial component and the same applies for residential area.

An Owners Corporation manager is the entity hired by the Owners Corporation to provide professional assistance to manage its common property. An Owners Corporation manager ensures the operation of the Owners Corporation is effective and in compliance with the Owners Corporation Act 2006.

An Owners Corporation manager will carry out all administrative tasks on behalf of the Owners Corporation, including:

  • Send out notices of meetings, including the agenda, for annual, special and committee meetings.
  • Attend and chair general meetings as required.
  • Publish minutes of meetings and circulate them to all owners.
  • Act upon and follow through all resolutions of meetings.
  • Manage the placement of the insurance for the Owners Corporation as well the handling of Owners Corporation insurance claims.
  • Maintain the records of the Owners Corporation, including the Owners Corporation Register and financial records.
  • Prepare various documentation as required by various pieces of legislation.
  • Prepare administration fund budgets for each financial year.
  • Prepare the annual financial statements.
  • Issue fee notices and collect contributions and levies.
  • Pursue debts of lot owners.
  • Manage invoices and pay contractors and tradespeople.

In addition, good Owners Corporation management involves much more than carrying out administrative tasks for the Owners Corporation. Good management also involves:

  • Regular communication with committee members, lot owners and other professionals such as solicitors and real estate agents.
  • Assistance, guidance and advice in large scale maintenance projects, renovation projects and emergency works.
  • Experience and knowledge of repairs and maintenance and access to a reliable pool of reasonable, trustworthy and skilled tradespeople.

By default a Tier 1 Owners Corporation must appoint a Manager – Owners Corporations Act 2006 S119 (1). The services of a professional manager are essential to assist Owners Corporations to comply with the complicated administrative and legislative requirements. Note: Section 119 (1) of the Owners Corporations Act 2006 does provide a pathway for Tier 1 Owners Corporations to opt-out of this default requirement.

Owners Corporations which are Tiers 2, 3, 4 & 5, can choose to be self-managed.  Self-management is more common in smaller developments with a larger percentage of owner-occupiers.

The main reasons Owners Corporations choose to appoint a Manager includes:

  1. The administrative burden requires a significant time commitment.
  2. Potential legal and non-compliance risk.
  3. Being responsible for fellow lot owners funds and preparing detailed financial reports.
  4. Difficulty and challenges in coordinating tradespeople.
  5. Having to find and appoint a manager at short notice if the current self-managing lot owner has disappeared, becomes incapacitated or decides to sell their lot.
  6. If the self-managing lot owner has not maintained the Owners Corporation records in compliance with the Act this may negatively affect a lot owners ability to sell their lot.

The appointment of an Owners Corporation is typically arranged by the Owners Corporation committee and then voted on at a General Meeting.

The committee would normally obtain a number of quotations from suitably experienced Owners Corporation Managers and then review the quotations against the criteria relevant / predetermined by the Owners Corporation. Strata Community Australia (Vic) is able to provide a criteria template if an Owners Corporation does not have such a document.

The appropriate motion would need to be prepared and included in the agenda of the notice of meeting.

The Motion should include the term of appointment, the cost and all the other conditions of your Owners Corporation management service will be included in the Term of Appointment. An easy to way to present this information is by attaching the proposed contract of appointment.

There are several resources available to you which provide more information about Owners Corporations:

Lot entitlement and lot liability are terms used on the plan of subdivision and apply to individual lots as follows:

Lot entitlement refers to the entitlement a lot owner has with respect to the common property, ie., the lot’s ownership of the common property and voting rights.

Lot liability refers to the liability a lot owner has with respect to the common property, ie., the share of Owners Corporation expenses that each lot owner is required to pay.

For example, the table below has 10 units of liability and 10 units of entitlement allocated to each lot. Each lot will therefore have 10% of the entitlement (votes / ownership) and 10% of the liability (expenses incurred by the Owners Corporation).

Lot Lot entitlement Lot liability
1 10 10
2 10 10
3 10 10
4 10 10
5 10 10
6 10 10
7 10 10
8 10 10
9 10 10
10 10 10
Total 100 100

The lot entitlement and lot liability varies from plan of subdivision to plan of subdivision. Surveyors take various factors into account when determining these figures, some of which are as follows:

  • Size of the lot.
  • Value of the lot.
  • The proximity of the lot in the property.

Lot owners within an Owners Corporation have several obligations, some of which are listed as follows:

 General Requirements
Must comply with the Owners Corporations Act and the regulations under that Act and the rules of the Owners Corporation. To pay fees, levies and charges issued by the Owners Corporation on time. To be respectful of other occupants, lot owners and tenants at the property.
 Maintenance Requirements
Properly maintain in a state of good and serviceable repair any part of your lot that affects the outward appearance of the lot or the use or enjoyment of other lots or the common property. Must not use or neglect the common property or permit it to be used or neglected in a manner that is likely to cause damage or deterioration to the common property. Maintain any service that serves your lot exclusively.
 Selling and Purchasing Requirements
To give notice to the Owners Corporation if you make an application for a building permit tor planning permit of the certification of a plan of subdivision affecting the lot.  If you sell your lot you must advise the Owners Corporation of the name and address of the new owner within one month of the completion of the contract. If you have acquired a lot you must advise the Owners Corporation of the person’s name and address within one month of the completion of the contract.
Occupancy Requirements
If you do not occupy the lot or will be absent from the lot for more than 3 months you must advise the Owners Corporation of your mailing address in Australia for service for notices and any changes to it as soon as possible. If you do not occupy the lot you must provide a copy of the rules of the Owners Corporation to your tenant. A lot 0M1er who does not occupy his or her lot must give the occupier of the lot a copy of the rules of the Owners Corporation at the commencement of occupation; and a copy of the consolidated rules of the Owners Corporation as soon as possible after it is lodged with the Registrar.

Complaints are commonly raised in Owners Corporations. Your Owners Corporation should have policies and procedures in place to help Owners Corporation members and others living in the Owners Corporation to deal with grievances.

Owners or tenants must make their complaints to the Owners Corporation in writing.

The legislation makes provisions for Owners Corporations to be able to delegate authority to allow it to operate and make decisions as it sees fit (but within the boundaries of the legislation).

The legislation makes provisions for three types of resolutions (decisions) that an Owners Corporation can make and each of the resolutions has a criteria that needs to be met for the resolution to be passed.

Ordinary Resolution

Most decisions made at general meetings are done so via an ordinary, or general, resolution. For an Owners Corporation to make an ordinary resolution, at least 50% of people in attendance at the meeting, or voting by proxy, must vote in favour. Decisions such as approving the Owners Corporation budget, changing the caretaker, or decisions around the properties insurance needs are made in this way.

Special Resolution (75% of votes in favour)

Some decisions, such as making changes to the Owners Corporations rules or granting a lease for exclusive use of Owners Corporation property, require a special resolution to be passed. For a special resolution to be passed a properly convened meeting must be held and 75% of people attending, in person or by proxy, who are eligible to vote, must vote in favour of the motion. In this case, the value of each vote is determined by the unit entitlement of each lot.

Unanimous Resolution (100% of votes in favour).

For some decisions, such as the alteration to a plan of subdivision, the vote in favour needs to be unanimous for a motion to be passed, and members do not need to be financial to be eligible to vote.

Each of these types of resolutions can be considered at an Annual General Meeting. In between such meetings Owners Corporations will still need to make decisions and as such must elect a Chairperson and Secretary and Owners Corporations with greater than 13 lots must elect a committee of lot owners (or their proxies) to facilitate such decision making.

The legislation delegates all powers to committee members that can be delegated (Ordinary Resolutions). An Owners Corporation can quarantine certain Ordinary Resolutions to be only be considered at an Annual General Meeting or Special General Meeting.

The legislation prohibits the Owners Corporation from delegating the powers of a Special Resolution and / or Unanimous Resolution.

An Owners Corporation committee must elect a chairperson. This person also becomes the Owners Corporation chairperson.

All Owners Corporations, committees and delegates are required to:

  • act honestly and in good faith
  • exercise due care and diligence in carrying out their functions, powers and activities
  • not make improper use of their position to gain, directly or indirectly, an advantage for themselves or for any other person (Consumer Affairs Victoria).

A Maintenance Plan is document prepared by a Quantity Surveyor or appropriately qualified professional after the assets of the common property have been reviewed / surveyed / recorded which sets out the likely expenses related to those assets over a ten year period.

The maintenance plan must set out—

  • The major capital items anticipated to require repair and replacement within the next 10 years.
  • The present condition or state of repair of those items.
  • When those items or components of those items will need to be repaired or replaced.
  • The estimated cost of the repair and replacement of those items or components.
  • The expected life of those items or components once repaired or replaced.
  • Any other prescribed information.

“Major capital item” includes—

  • Lift.
  • Air conditioning plant.
  • Heating plant.
  • An item of a prescribed class.

Recently the list of items included under “major capital item” has been expanded to include:

  • Common property structures including the roof, stairways, balustrades, and window frames.
  • Common property services, such as shared water, gas and sewerage pipes, pumps, drains, electrical and telephony infrastructure.
  • Common property assets, such as fences, pools, and water tanks.

After the Owners Corporation adopts the Maintenance Plan at its Annual General Meeting it will set an amount to be collected periodically from the lot owners and this amount will be held in the Maintenance Fund. The Maintenance Fund is collected from lot owners based on lot liability in the same manner that the Administration Fund is.

In line with the Owners Corporation Act 2006 an Owners Corporation must repair and maintain:

  • The common property.
  • The chattels, fixtures, fittings and services related to the common property or its enjoyment.
  • A service in or relating to a lot that is for the benefit of more than one lot and the common property.

Cost of repairs, maintenance or other works

An Owners Corporation may recover as a debt the cost of repairs, maintenance or other works undertaken wholly or substantially for the benefit of one or some, but not all, of the lots affected by the Owners Corporation from the lot owners.

The amount payable by the lot owners is to be calculated on the basis that the lot owner of the lot that benefits more pays more.

The works referred to may be to the common property or a lot.

Significant alteration to common property requires special resolution

An Owners Corporation must not make a significant alteration to the use or appearance of the common property unless:

  • The alteration is first approved by a special resolution of the Owners Corporation,
  • is permitted by the maintenance plan, or
  • there are reasonable grounds to believe that an immediate alteration is necessary to ensure safety or to prevent significant loss or damage.

Upgrading of common property

An Owners Corporation may by special resolution approve the carrying out of upgrading works for the common property and the levying of fees on lot owners for that purpose.

The fees must be based on lot liability except where the works are carried out wholly or substantially for the benefit of some or one, but not all, of the lots affected by the Owners Corporation. In this case the lot(s) that benefit more pay more.

An Owners Corporation may, at the request and expense of a lot owner, repair and maintain a service in or relating to a lot if it is impracticable for the lot owner to repair or maintain that service.

The Owners Corporation may serve a notice on the lot owner requiring the lot owner to carry out the necessary repairs, maintenance or other works if a lot owner has refused or failed to carry out repairs, maintenance or other works to the lot owner’s lot that are required because:

  • The outward appearance or outward state of repair of the lot is adversely affected.
  • The use and enjoyment of the lots or common property by other lot owners is adversely affected.

Provision of services to members and occupiers

An Owners Corporation, by special resolution, may decide:

  • To provide a service to lot owners or occupiers of lots or the public.
  • To enter into agreements for the provision of services to lot owners or occupiers of lots.
  • An Owners Corporation may require a lot owner or occupier to whom a service has been provided to pay for the cost of providing the service to the lot owner or occupier.

As per the Owners Corporation Act 2006, an Owners Corporation must take out reinstatement and replacement insurance for all buildings on the common property for:

  • The cost necessary to replace, repair or rebuild the property to a condition substantially the same, but not better or more extensive than its condition when new.
  • The payment of expenses necessarily and reasonably incurred in the removal of debris and the remuneration of architects and other persons whose services are necessary, being incidental to the replacement, repair or rebuilding of the damaged property.

The insurance required under subsection (1) of s.59 of the Act includes reinstatement and replacement insurance for the Owners Corporation’s portion of any shared services.

There is also a requirement for public liability insurance ($20,000,000 minimum cover – OC Act 2006 S60 (3))

An insurable building includes:

  • Any building on the plan of subdivision.
  • Any improvements and fixtures forming part of the building.
  • Any shared service.
  • Anything prescribed as forming part of the building.

But does not include:

  • Carpet and temporary floor, wall and ceiling coverings.
  • Fixtures removable by a lessee at the end of a lease.
  • Anything prescribed as not forming part of a building.

NOTE: “shared services” includes any pipes or cables used to provide services including water, electricity, gas and telecommunications to the building that are shared with a person other than the Owners Corporation or any of its members.

Under S65 (1) of the Owners Corporations Act 2006, Tiers 1, 2, 3 & 4 are required to obtain a sworn valuation for insurance purposes every five years. This law is intended to protect Owners Corporations and their members by having an independent valuer ensure that building replacement insurance is set at the correct level. The state industry body SCA recommends that Owners Corporation obtain a sworn valuation every three years.

Owners Corporations that do not have valuations are at risk of being under or over-insured. Owners Corporations that are over-insured could be paying funds unnecessarily. Owners Corporations that are under-insured are not meeting the legislative requirements and are at risk of not being able to rebuild in case of a total loss.

This information can be provided upon request. You can email the manager directly or use the use the following form. [ninja_form id=4]

The Insurance Policy held by the Owners Corporation allows for insurance claims to be made where the loss incurred is an insurable event.

Please find attached links for more information relating to Insurance Claims.

Owners Corporations are responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of the common property and must collect funds from the members of the Owners Corporation in order to pay for the cost of maintaining, repairing and attending to the administration of the common property.

The Owners Corporation typically establishes a budget to allow for such expenses and at the Annual General Meeting will establish an Administration Fund based on the budget contributed to by each lot owner.

The contribution to be made by each lot owner is determined by the lot liability attached to that lot in the Plan of Subdivision.

During the financial year the Owners Corporation manager will process payments for routine related items of expenditure as they occur, on some occasions engage contractors to deal with maintenance related items ie., plumbing, electrical or intercom related issues and process payments to the contractors and at the end of the financial year prepare and present a set of financial accounts to the Owners Corporation for its consideration.

Such a financial statement should be clear, concise and unambiguous. Lot owners should be able to easily determine the financial position of the Owners Corporation i.e. its Assets, Liabilities and its Net Financial Position, and should also be be able to quickly review and analyse where every dollar has been spent.

Owners Corporations have a number of routine recurrent items of expenditure that it would normally allow for, including:

  • Insurance.
  • Management fees.
  • Essential safety measures.
  • Utilities (electricity, water, gas).
  • Caretaking / cleaning / gardening.
  • Garden irrigation maintenance.
  • Window cleaning.
  • Roof drainage cleaning and maintenance.
  • Other minor repairs and or general expenses.

Larger style properties may have additional plant, equipment and machinery that require additional servicing and related costs, including:

  • Lift maintenance.
  • Car stackers.
  • Bin chutes and garbage compacting equipment.
  • Automated exit / entry doors.
  • Automated vehicle exit / entrance doors / gates.
  • Central hot water plant.
  • Central heating / cooling plant.
  • Swimming pool, spa and or sauna.
  • Gymnasium with free weights, machine weights and cardio vascular equipment.
  • Roof / height safety access equipment.
  • Pumps for basement area including storm water, lift well and rainwater reticulation systems.
  • Library / study area / cinema.

Such larger properties may also have on site services, including:

  • Building management.
  • Facility management.
  • Concierge.
  • On site Owners Corporation management.
  • On site real estate property manager.

The routine items of expenditure are accounted for in an Administration Fund and lot owners contributions to this fund are normally collected once a quarter / once every six months.

The larger style items are typically accounted for in a Maintenance Plan and an Owners Corporation can strike a Maintenance Fund to assist covering the cost of these larger style items.

The Owners Corporations Regulations make provision for Model Rules for Owners Corporations. The rules make general provisions for expected levels of behaviour at the property and others address administrative issues related to the use of the common property.

Owners Corporations have the ability to make additional rules if granted permission by special resolution.

Owners Corporations cannot make rules that conflict with other laws – it is widely accepted practice that the drafting of such rules be completed by a solicitor experienced in this area of the law.

The legislation makes provision for an Owners Corporation to deal with complaints.

The dispute resolution process is prescriptive with the actions that are required to be taken if a complaint is submitted to the Owners Corporation using the prescribed form.

If your Owners Corporation does not create your rules, the default rules which are called ‘Model Rules’ will apply.

If your Owners Corporation plans to make new rules, you need to make sure the new rules follow the requirements of the Owners Corporation Act 2006 and the Australian Consumer Law and Fair Trading Act 2012. These regulations protect yours and other people’s rights, such as privacy, anti-discrimination and so on.

Rules are usually made around health, safety and security; behaviour; use and damage of common property; noise control and dispute resolution.

According to Sub section 32 (5) of the Sale of Land Act 1962 (VIC), you must have an Owners Corporation Certificate if you wish to sell your property.

This certificate includes a wide range of important information about the property.

For more information on what should be included in an OC certificate see this detailed list from Consumer Affairs Victoria.

Order an OC Certificate

A certificate of currency is a document issued by your insurance company which confirms that your insurance policy is current and notes details such as the policy type, sum insured, and policy expiry date. It reflects information that is current as at the date of your request.

For more information on why you may need a certificate of currency, see this question and answer information sheet.

If you are a lot owner and need your mortgagee to be noted on the insurance policy you will need to make contact direct with the insurer. If you do not know who the insurer is you can request the information from the manager by email or use the following link.

Request Insurer Details